Securities Class Action

The Second Circuit, affirming the Southern District of New York’s dismissal of a ’33 Act securities class action, reaffirmed that the Circuit’s operative test for determining the materiality of omissions is the test set forth in DeMaria v. Andersen, 318 F.3d 170 (2d Cir. 2003), and explicitly rejected the First Circuit’s test in Shaw v. Digital Equipment Corp., 82 F.3d 1194 (1st Cir. 1996). In refusing to adopt Shaw’s standard—known as the “extreme departure” test—the court endorsed a test that it determined to be the “classic materiality standard in the omission context” and rejected the test that it found to “leave too many open questions” and to be “analytically counterproductive.”
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In a 5-4 decision split along traditional ideological lines, the U.S. Supreme Court held in CalPERS v. ANZ Securities, Inc., 582 U.S. ___ (2017), that the statute of repose in Section 13 of the Securities Act cannot be tolled under any circumstances. In particular, the Court held that the 3-year repose period—unlike the 2-year

Overruling (or, at least, creatively re-characterizing) its own precedent, the Ninth Circuit held in Resh v. China Agritech, Inc., — F.3d —-, 2017 WL 2261024 (9th Cir. May 24, 2017), that the pendency of an earlier uncertified class action tolls the statute of limitations not only for later-filed individual claims, but for subsequent class actions as well. The Ninth Circuit’s decision opens the door to the possibility of serial, successive attempts to certify a class in securities (and other) cases, potentially exposing defendants to an almost never-ending series of class action lawsuits.
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In a matter of first impression in the Ninth Circuit, the court applied the Supreme Court’s Omnicare standard for pleading the falsity of a statement of opinion to a Section 10(b) claim in City of Dearborn Heights Act 345 Police & Fire Retirement System v. Align Technology, Inc., — F.3d —, 2017 WL 1753276

In Brennan v. Zafgen, Inc., — F.3d –, 2017 WL 1291194 (1st Cir., April 7, 2017), the First Circuit affirmed a District of Massachusetts decision dismissing claims against Zafgen, Inc., a biopharmaceutical developer, and its CEO, Dr. Thomas Hughes. Judge Stahl, writing for a panel that included retired Supreme Court Justice Souter (sitting by designation),

A senior officer’s violations of a corporation’s code of conduct do not give rise to a claim for violation of the federal securities laws—even where the corporation (including the officer himself) has touted the company’s high standards for compliance with its own ethical code. That was the Ninth Circuit’s holding in a recent opinion affirming a district court’s dismissal of a putative class action filed against Hewlett-Packard and its former CEO and Chairman, Mark Hurd. Retail Wholesale & Department Store Union Local 338 Retirement Fund v. Hewlett-Packard Co. and Mark A. Hurd, 845 F.3d 1268 (9th Cir. 2017). The case arose out of Hurd’s departure from the company following revelations of Hurd’s relationship with an HP contractor and subsequent efforts to cover up the relationship. Plaintiffs brought claims under Section 10 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5, alleging that HP had materially misrepresented or alternatively made material omissions about its high ethical standards and compliance with its Standards of Business Conduct (“SBC”), where its Chairman and CEO was found to have violated the SBC.
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The First Circuit affirmed the dismissal of nearly all securities class action claims against Ariad Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Ariad) and four corporate officers, in In re Ariad Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Securities Litig., 842 F.3d 744 (1st Cir. 2016). The litigation focused on Ariad’s public statements about the potential for FDA approval of an experimental drug designed to treat a particular type of leukemia. Ariad made robust public statements about the efficacy of the drug, until the FDA pulled the drug from clinical trials amid negative side effects. The First Circuit found that other than one statement, the allegations of misrepresentations were insufficient to support a strong inference of scienter. The court also held that the allegations of insider trading were not actionable.
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The 11th Circuit ignored the potential application of the Supreme Court’s 2015 decision in Omnicare, and instead reached back to its own precedent dating from 1979, in holding that plaintiffs are foreclosed from bringing a claim that a company misled shareholders about its real motivations for engaging in a stock repurchase program.

In its

The Third Circuit engaged in a searching analysis of plaintiffs’ falsity and scienter allegations and found them insufficient under the exacting standards of the Reform Act, upholding the district court’s dismissal of the complaint in OFI Asset Management v. Cooper Tire & Rubber, — F.3d —, 2016 WL 4434404 (3d Cir. 2016).

In its

The Sixth Circuit has joined a majority of the other circuit courts in recognizing that loss causation can be shown through a “materialization of the risk” theory,” reversing the dismissal of a case against Freddie Mac stemming from the 2007 mortgage crisis.

In Ohio Public Employees Retirement Sys. v. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. (“Freddie