The First Circuit recently affirmed dismissal of claims under Section 10(b) and Rule 10b-5 as failing to meet the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act’s standard for pleading scienter. Corban v. Sarepta Thereapeutics, Inc., 868 F.3d 31, 42 (2017). The claims grew out of drug maker Sarepta’s description of its prospects for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a gene-therapy drug. In assessing the adequacy of the scienter allegations, the court looked primarily at the chronology of the drug maker’s statements and interactions with the FDA and whether it had a motive to lie, and it concluded that neither supported a strong inference of scienter. As Judge William Kayatta wrote for the three-judge panel that included Senior Judge Norman Stahl and retired Supreme Court Justice David Souter: “This is simply a case in which the complaint focuses too much on nuance rather than false facts or material omissions to support the necessary strong inference of scienter.” Id.
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In this putative class action, investors alleged that Biogen executives misled the public about the impact on sales of the company’s multiple sclerosis drug Tecfidera after one patient’s death. Plaintiffs alleged violations of Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act by Biogen and three Biogen executives. The First Circuit affirmed the District Court’s

In a matter of first impression in the Ninth Circuit, the court applied the Supreme Court’s Omnicare standard for pleading the falsity of a statement of opinion to a Section 10(b) claim in City of Dearborn Heights Act 345 Police & Fire Retirement System v. Align Technology, Inc., — F.3d —, 2017 WL 1753276

In Brennan v. Zafgen, Inc., — F.3d –, 2017 WL 1291194 (1st Cir., April 7, 2017), the First Circuit affirmed a District of Massachusetts decision dismissing claims against Zafgen, Inc., a biopharmaceutical developer, and its CEO, Dr. Thomas Hughes. Judge Stahl, writing for a panel that included retired Supreme Court Justice Souter (sitting by designation),

The First Circuit affirmed the dismissal of nearly all securities class action claims against Ariad Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Ariad) and four corporate officers, in In re Ariad Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Securities Litig., 842 F.3d 744 (1st Cir. 2016). The litigation focused on Ariad’s public statements about the potential for FDA approval of an experimental drug designed to treat a particular type of leukemia. Ariad made robust public statements about the efficacy of the drug, until the FDA pulled the drug from clinical trials amid negative side effects. The First Circuit found that other than one statement, the allegations of misrepresentations were insufficient to support a strong inference of scienter. The court also held that the allegations of insider trading were not actionable.
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Reversing a district court’s dismissal of a securities class action for failure to adequately allege scienter, the Ninth Circuit held in Schwartz v. Arena Pharmaceuticals, Inc. — F.3d —-, 2016 WL 6246875 (9th Cir. Oct. 26, 2016), that the facts alleged in the complaint gave rise to a strong inference of scienter where the defendants

Analogizing a plaintiff’s allegations to “brushstrokes” intended to paint a “portrait” of scienter, the First Circuit found those allegations “cover[ed] too little canvas” to give rise to the strong inference of scienter required under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act.  See Local No. 8 IBEW Ret. Plan & Trust v. Vertex Pharmaceuticals, — F.3d

The Third Circuit engaged in a searching analysis of plaintiffs’ falsity and scienter allegations and found them insufficient under the exacting standards of the Reform Act, upholding the district court’s dismissal of the complaint in OFI Asset Management v. Cooper Tire & Rubber, — F.3d —, 2016 WL 4434404 (3d Cir. 2016).

In its

In Anderson v. Spirit Aerosystems Holdings, Inc., — F.3d —, 2016 WL 3607032 (10th Cir. 2016), the Tenth Circuit provided a blueprint for how to analyze securities class action scienter allegations, looking carefully at allegations made by confidential witnesses, examining the challenged statements in context, evaluating plaintiffs’ motive allegations, and weighing conflicting inferences of innocence and scienter.
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From time to time, D&O Developments will take a closer look at an important issue decided in an appellate opinion.  In this post, I analyze In re ChinaCast Education Corp. Securities Litigation, 809 F.3d 471 (9th Cir. 2015), in which the Ninth Circuit reversed the dismissal of a securities class action against ChinaCast Education