On July 7, the Second Circuit affirmed in part and vacated in part an order by Judge Rakoff of the S.D.N.Y. certifying two classes in the In re Petrobras Securities litigation, — F.3d –, 2017 WL 2883874 (2d Cir., July 7, 2017). In doing so, the Second Circuit joined several other circuits in declining to

The Second Circuit, affirming the Southern District of New York’s dismissal of a ’33 Act securities class action, reaffirmed that the Circuit’s operative test for determining the materiality of omissions is the test set forth in DeMaria v. Andersen, 318 F.3d 170 (2d Cir. 2003), and explicitly rejected the First Circuit’s test in Shaw v. Digital Equipment Corp., 82 F.3d 1194 (1st Cir. 1996). In refusing to adopt Shaw’s standard—known as the “extreme departure” test—the court endorsed a test that it determined to be the “classic materiality standard in the omission context” and rejected the test that it found to “leave too many open questions” and to be “analytically counterproductive.”
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In a 91-page opinion covering several important securities-litigation issues, the Second Circuit upheld the district court’s partial judgment against Vivendi following a three-month jury trial that resulted in the jury finding Vivendi liable under Section 10(b) and Rule 10b-5.

As I was preparing to summarize the opinion for this blog, I read a summary by

The Second Circuit has issued another confirmation of the high bar for imposing liability on external auditors under the securities laws, and of the importance of the protections created for opinions by the Supreme Court in Omnicare, Inc. v. Laborers District Council Construction Industry Pension Fund, 135 S. Ct. 1318 (2015). The unpublished decision,

In another entry in the large field of securities fraud suits involving Chinese companies traded on U.S. exchanges, the Second Circuit affirmed in an unpublished memorandum the dismissal of investors’ claims against an auditor for failing to detect and disclose that a company’s CEO was pilfering the company’s coffers for personal gain.

In Special Situations

On March 19, 2016, the Second Circuit revived securities fraud claims brought by investors against SAIC, Inc., and individual defendants, alleging material misstatements and omissions in SAIC’s public filings related to its exposure to liability for employee fraud. Though a win for the plaintiffs in this particular case, the ruling provided useful ammunition for the

Issued just shy of the one-year anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Omnicare decision in Omnicare, the Second Circuit’s ruling in Tongue v. Sanofi, 816 F.3d 199 (2d Cir. 2016), is the most significant post-Omnicare ruling thus far. The Sanofi court not only correctly applied the Court’s rulings on the standard for evaluating

The Second Circuit affirmed the dismissal of a securities fraud claim against an outside, independent auditor for failure to adequately allege scienter, emphasizing that the standards for pleading scienter against independent auditors are “extremely demanding.”

In an unpublished decision in Zech Capital LLC v. Ernst & Young Hua Ming, 636 Fed. Appx. 582 (2nd